Dr. Wayne W. Dyer on “Leadership” -how it is defined and who actually leads us during this election season.

I am reading Dr. Wayne W. Dyer’s book, Wisdom of the Ages, today and wanted to share the following passages with anyone who will listen as we close in on election day:

“I am frequently amazed at how many contemporary politicians refer to themselves as “leaders” by virtue of the fact that they hold public office. Historically it is clear that public office holders are seldom the true leaders causing change. For instance, who were the leaders of the Renaissance? Were they the public office holders? Were the leaders the mayors, governors, and presidents of European capitals? No.

The leaders were the artists, writers, and musicians who listened to their hearts and souls and expressed what they heard, leading others to discover a resonating voice within themselves!

(Ever consider the titles you are known by (father, brother, leader, coach, manager) and how you try to live up to them?) ….You may carry the title of mother or father (which is an awesome responsiblity), and your kids may see you as the leader of the family, and thus seek your advice, but remember that what you truly want is for them to be able to say is, “I did it myself,” rather than give you credit. and so, enhance your leadership by being constantly alert to the mistake of thinking that your title makes you a leader….True leaders are not known by titles! It is EGO that loves titles!”

[In this passage, Dr. Dyer’s line of thinking is inspired by the ‘Tao Te Ching’ (meaing ‘the way’), the basis for ‘Taoism,’ written by Sixth Century Chinese Philosopher, LAO-TZU, he expressed this truth about leaders this way:

“True Leaders
are hardly known to their followers.
Next after them are the leaders
the people know and admire;
after them, those they fear;
after them, those they despise.

To give no trust
is to get no trust.

When the work’s done right,
with no fuss or boasting,
ordinary people say,
“Oh, we did it.”

-LAO-TZU (6th century B.C.)

Dr. Dyer follows up with this, “…….True leaders enjoy the trust of others, which is very different from enjoying the perks and flattery and power that the ego insists are the signs of being a leader. You need to give trust to others in order to receive that trust and be a true leader.”

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Scroll down through these fine poems and leave your own favorite in the reply box, Thanks!

My sixth grade English teacher, Mr. Bobino, made us memorize a different poem or important historical piece (preamble to the constitution, the Gettysburg address, etc) every month. Now with a son of my own, I have been reminded of how much I enjoyed learning a new poem each month and how much I believe a young boy can gain from doing so, and I would like to start a new monthly poem book of my own to learn from as, sadly, Mr. Bobino’s little yellow book has long since left me. Please feel free to add your suggestions to the comments section below. Thank you for helping me with my list.

The Road not Taken, By Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood

and sorry I could not travel both

And be one traveller, long I stood

and looked down one as far as I could

to where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,

and having perhaps the better claim

because it was grassy and wanted wear;

though as for that, the passing there

had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay

in leaves no feet had trodden black.

Oh, I kept the first for another day!

Yet knowing how way leads on to way,

I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh

Somewhere ages and ages hence:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —

I took the one less travelled by,

and that has made all the difference

“Running The Numbers: An American Self Portrait,” by Chris Jordan

Chris Jordan is a brilliant photographer who I recently stumbled across Online. Below are two photos from “American Consumerism.” One of cellphone chargers, the other of Cellphones. Below those two photos is Cans Seurat, 2007, art depicting 106,000 aluminum cans, the amount used in the United States every thirty seconds. Visit his site to see these two great exhibits, “Running the Numbers: An American Self Portrait by Chris Jordan 2006-20007,” which depicts art created by large round numbers of consumable products which show exactly how much waste we create every second in the United States; and “Intolerable Beauty: Portraits of American Mass Consumption, by Chris Jordan 2003-2005.”

The art of Running the Numbers: An American Self Portrait by Chris Jordan 2006-20007 (click here to see),” is created out of the following listed items, with additional info about that item’s consumption to make the artist’s point:

Depicts 30,000 reams of office paper, or 15 million sheets, equal to the amount of office paper used in the US every five minutes.

Depicts two million plastic beverage bottles, the number used in the US every five minutes.

Depicts 60,000 plastic bags, the number used in the US every five seconds.

Depicts 170,000 disposable Energizer batteries, equal to fifteen minutes of Energizer battery production.

Depicts nine million wooden ABC blocks, equal to the number of American children with no health insurance coverage in 2007.

Depicts 8 million toothpicks, equal to the number of trees harvested in the US every month to make the paper for mail order catalogs.

Depicts 11,000 jet trails, equal to the number of commercial flights in the US every eight hours.

Depicts 426,000 cell phones, equal to the number of cell phones retired in the US every day.

Depicts 1.14 million brown paper supermarket bags, the number used in the US every hour.

Depicts 106,000 aluminum cans, the number used in the US every thirty seconds.

Depicts 65,000 cigarettes, equal to the number of American teenagers under age eighteen who become addicted to cigarettes every month.

Depicts 213,000 Vicodin pills, equal to the number of emergency room visits yearly in the US related to misuse or abuse of prescription pain killers.

Depicts 29,569 handguns, equal to the number of gun-related deaths in the US in 2004.

Depicts 24,000 logos from the GMC Yukon Denali, equal to six weeks of sales of that model SUV in 2004.

Depicts 2.3 million folded prison uniforms, equal to the number of Americans incarcerated in 2005.American Consumerism Photo Exhibit, Chris Jordan

cellphones

Cans Seurat, 2007
60×92″

Depicts 106,000 aluminum cans, the number used in the US every thirty seconds:

depicts 106,000 aluminum cans, the amount used every thirty seconds in the United States

Can detail from above, up close:

these cans made the art above!