Remember Veterans Today, and Intel announces “largest advance in 40 years” on Monday, 12 November 2007.

microchip on fingertip

–Visit AmillionThanks.org this Veteran’s Day and send a little love and appreciation to a soldier who needs it.

–AMillionThanks.org is a year-round campaign to show our U.S. Military Men and Women, past and present, our appreciation for their sacrifices, dedication, and service to our country through our letters, emails, cards, prayers, and thoughts.

–Voice of America on this year’s Veteran’s Day in Washington, D.C.

–A nice article about Veteran’s Day’s evolution and troop casualties and injuries over the past Century.

–By Sari N. Kent
Staff Writer: ToTheCenter.com:

–“Intel Corp. is poised to unveil its latest line of microchips, which are already receiving glowing reviews.

According to the Wall Street Journal’s web site, “The company’s latest chips, being formally announced Monday…were built with new manufacturing materials. Intel is building transistors in the chips out of a material called hafnium instead of silicon dioxide, a mainstay of the industry since the 1960s.”

The senior vice president and general manage of Intel’s mobility group is heralding the advance as one of the largest in 40 years.

The Reuters web site further elaborates on the new chips. “Known by the project name Penryn (the first family of 45-nanometer chips in the world), the chips hold little in the way of fundamental design advances but are an important step in continuing the industry’s track record of delivering chips that get smaller and faster every two years or so… Penryn is the ‘tick’ in Intel’s ‘tick-tock’ strategy of shrinking an existing chip design to a smaller size, then following up the next year with an all-new blueprint, known as a microarchitecture.”

With these chips, Intel looks to decrease chip size while increasing its speed. They will be sold under Intel’s Xeon and Core 2 brands and will be able to run software up to 15 percent faster.

The Reuters web site also talked about what this will mean for the future of the company. “It cements Intel’s manufacturing lead over rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc (AMD.N: Quote, Profile, Research), which only started making chips on 65 nanometers earlier this year but plans to try to roll out 45 nanometer technology in 2008.””

Military Families Speak Out in response to new Army report claiming soldier suicide rate is highest in last 26 years.

‘New American’ reported this week concerning the newly released 2006 Army Suicide Event Report which acknowledged that Army soldiers committed suicide last year at the highest rate in twenty-six years. According to the report: “There was a significant relationship between suicide attempts and the number of days deployed.”

Rod Powers, About.com’s guide to the U.S. military, shared the following details of the report:

“The 165-page 2006 Army Suicide Event Report lists 99 deaths by suicide, with 27 of the deaths occurring in Iraq and three in Afghanistan. There were also 948 of what the report terms “serious attempts at suicide.” While the vast majority of the “completed suicides” in 2006 involved males, 10 of the victims were females, the report said. Seventy percent of the Soldiers were under 25, 98 percent were enlisted and 91 percent were from the regular Army. And while the suicide methods included drug overdoses, strangulation and poisoning, the vast majority – 71 percent – involved firearms.”

Military Families Speak Out Co-founder, Nancy Lessin, had this to say in response to the Army’s suicide report:

“It’s no coincidence that troops who are repeatedly deployed to a combat zone in a war that cannot be won and never should have started, are traumatized by the experience.” She added, “This report only shows the tip of the iceberg, as it does not cover those who took their own lives after leaving active duty service. Until the war in Iraq is brought to an end, we think this tragic reality will only become worse.”

Military Families Speak Out (MFSO) is a national organization of 3,600 families who are opposed to the war in Iraq and have loved ones in the military.