The dollar headed for the biggest weekly loss against the euro since December after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke signaled the bank may cut interest rates further to avert a recession.

(click play on video below to see more…)

the following is an excerpt of Feb. 15 (Bloomberg) article by By Stanley White and Kosuke Goto– “The dollar headed for the biggest weekly loss against the euro since December after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke signaled the bank may cut interest rates further to avert a recession.

The currency traded near a one-week low versus the euro as Bernanke said the Fed “will act in a timely manner as needed to support growth.” The allure of U.S. assets diminished as the yield premium of European government bonds over Treasuries widened to the most in more than a week.

“The dollar will remain weak today after Bernanke’s speech,” said Motonari Ogawa, vice president of interest-rate products and foreign exchange in Tokyo at Morgan Stanley, the second-largest U.S. securities firm. “The U.S. yield disadvantage is increasing. I was about to turn into a dollar- bull, but I’m now rethinking it.”

CNNMoney (See original article here.) By Brian O’Keefe, senior editor, quoting Jim Rogers on the US economy right now:

“Conceivably we could have just had recession, hard times, sliding dollar, inflation, etc., but I’m afraid it’s going to be much worse,” he says. “Bernanke is printing huge amounts of money. He’s out of control and the Fed is out of control. We are probably going to have one of the worst recessions we’ve had since the Second World War. It’s not a good scene.”

(The central bank’s second interest rate cut in a week raises the risk of inflation and bails out the banks.)

(Interest rate cut=increased money supply=inflation=hard times for poor and working families)

Rogers looks at the Fed’s willingness to add liquidity to an already inflationary environment and sees the history of the 1970s repeating itself. Does that mean stagflation? “It is a real danger and, in fact, a probability.”

Great explanation of what is going wrong with our economy and why we should be upset on behalf of the people and the founding fathers:

China’s latest export to the US: Inflation.

Published: February 1, 2008

inflation graph

SHANGHAI — China’s latest export is inflation. After falling for years, prices of Chinese goods sold in the United States have risen for the last eight months.

Soaring energy and raw material costs, a falling dollar and new business rules here are forcing Chinese factories to increase the prices of their exports, according to analysts and Western companies doing business here.

The rise was a modest 2.4 percent over the last year. But even that small amount, combined with higher energy and food costs that also reflect China’s growing demands on global resources, contributed to a rise in inflation in the United States. Inflation in the United States was 4.1 percent in 2007, up from 2.5 percent in 2006.

Because of new cost pressures here, American consumers could see prices increase by as much as 10 percent this year on specific products — including toys, clothing, footwear and other consumer goods — just as the United States faces a possible recession.

In the longer term, higher costs in China could spell the end of an era of ultra-cheap goods, as well as the beginning of China’s rise from the lowest rungs of global manufacturing.

Economists have been warning for months that this country’s decade-long role of keeping a lid on global inflation was on the wane.

“China has been the world’s factory and the anchor of the global disconnect between rising material prices and lower consumer prices,” said Dong Tao, an economist for Credit Suisse. “But its heyday is over. We’re going to see higher prices.”

“…In the meantime, makers of toys, apparel and footwear — highly labor-intensive industries — are being forced to consider raising prices even as growth in the United States slows, a rare confluence of events not seen in decades.

Companies that began outsourcing production to China in the 1990s mostly benefited from lower costs, which translated into both higher corporate profits and lower consumer prices. Now, many Western companies have to rethink pricing.

“Companies are now ordering for the spring of 2009,” says Nate Herman, director of international trade at the American Apparel and Footwear Association, based in Arlington, Va., that represents some big clothing and footwear makers. “Factories are coming back and asking for 20, 30, 40, 50 percent price increases.”

Will importers pass those costs on to consumers? “It’s going to be hard to avoid some increase,” he said.”

The U.S. Economy in 2007

“I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.” –Thomas Jefferson

“We face a coming financial crisis. Our current account deficit is more than $600 billion annually. Our foreign debt is more than $3 trillion. Foreigners now own over $1.4 trillion of our Treasury and mortgage debt…We must borrow $3 billion from foreigners every business day to maintain our extravagant spending. Our national debt now is increasing $600 billion per year, and guess what, we print over $600 billion per year to keep the charade going. But there is a limit and I’m fearful we’re fast approaching it.” –Congressman Ron Paul, M.D., September 17, 2005

“Make no mistake, the problems faced by the American people are not caused by unscrupulous mortgage brokers or the rising price of oil; these are symptoms of an economic disease caused by a spendthrift Congress enabled by loose monetary policy.” –Congressman Ron Paul, M.D., November 3, 2007

“Now, the Democrats have released a report on the total costs of the military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, including “hidden costs” such as interest on the money we’re borrowing, and long-term healthcare for vets…The bill comes to $3.5 trillion…If $3.5 trillion is the true cost of these military adventures, $11,500 is the amount every man, woman and child in this country pays. So, a family of four would pay $46,000 just for this war…In other words, war has cost more than an entire year’s worth of income from each middle class Texas family…Congress should not increase taxes by $3.5 trillion and the administration meeds to end the occupation of Iraq, with its costs of $3.5 trillion to taxpayers. Let the hardworking American taxpayers keep their money. Families need that $46,000 far more than government does.” –Congressman Ron Paul, M.D.

“Federal Spending, deficits, and Federal Reserve mischief hurt the poor while transferring wealth to the already rich. This is the real problem, and raising taxes on those who produce wealth will only make conditions worse. Borrowing money to cut the deficit is only marginally better than raising taxes. It may delay the pain for a while, but the cost of government eventually must be paid.

Federal borrowing means the cost of interest is added, shifting the burden to a different group than those who benefited and possibly even to another generation. Eventually borrowing is always paid for through taxation.” –Congressman Ron Paul M.D.