Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address inspires American Patriots

Some inspiration for us as we begin to engage citizens in restoring a citizen run Democracy:

Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Address, November 19, 1863:

“…that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain

that this nation, under God,

shall have a new birth of freedom

,

— and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

….Just something to think about.

A brief lesson on the “regressive” effects of a sales tax (and other ‘regressive’ taxation techniques which lead to poorer people paying higher percentage of incomes in taxes than those more fortunate in America:

A lesson on Regressive taxation brought to you by several anonymous contributors at Wikipedia (see whole article here), the world’s leading collaborative encyclopedia:

“A regressive tax is a tax imposed in such a manner that the effective tax rate decreases as the amount subject to taxation increases.[1][2][3][4] In simple terms, it imposes a greater burden (relative to resources) on the poor than on the rich. “Regressive” describes a distribution effect on income or expenditure, refering to the way the rate progresses from high to low. It can be applied to individual taxes or to a tax system as a whole; a year, multi-year, or lifetime. Regressive taxes attempt to reduce the tax incidence of people with higher ability-to-pay, as they shift the incidence disproportionately to those with lower ability-to-pay.

A simplified illustration of a regressive tax on income (proportional on consumption) is as follows: If Jane has $10 and John has $5, a tax of $1 on a purchase would result in a different percentage of total income applied to taxation, 20% for John and 10% for Jane. Thus, a tax that is fixed to the value of the good/service (as with sales tax)(without exemptions or rebates) would likely, in effect, result in a higher burden of taxation to people with less money (depending on consumption level and timeline examined – year or lifetime).

The opposite of a regressive tax is a progressive tax, where the tax rate increases as the amount subject to taxation increases.[5][6][7][8] In between is a proportional tax, where the tax rate is fixed as the amount subject to taxation increases.

The term is frequently applied in reference to fixed taxes, where every person has to pay the same amount of money. The regressivity of a particular tax often depends on the propensity of the tax payers to engage in the taxed activity relative to their income. In other words, if the activity being taxed is more likely to be carried out by the poor and less likely to be carried out by the rich, then the tax may be considered regressive. To determine whether a tax is regressive, the income-elasticity of the good being taxed as well as the income-substitution effect must be considered.

A simplified illustration of a regressive tax on income (proportional on consumption) is as follows: If Jane has $10 and John has $5, a tax of $1 on a purchase would result in a different percentage of total income applied to taxation, 20% for John and 10% for Jane. Thus, a tax that is fixed to the value of the good/service (as with sales tax)(without exemptions or rebates) would likely, in effect, result in a higher burden of taxation to people with less money (depending on consumption level and timeline examined – year or lifetime).

A regressive tax system does not mean and likely would not result in low income earners paying more taxes than the wealthy, only that the effective tax rate relative to income or consumption would be a larger tax burden to low income earners.”

Larry the Loophole! Educating us all on equitable taxation in America

see more educational taxation videos here.

“Hyper Milers” claim to get 100+miles per gallon out of contemporary hybrids (in USA Today article today.)

100 mpg? For ‘hypermilers,’ that sounds about right

…Saw this article in USA Today today (click here to read whole article), thought it was interesting and with $4.00+ per gallon gas(current US avg. price is $4.072/gal. according to AAA), we could all use a few gas saving tips…

an excerpt:

“…After a 29-mile jaunt from his Phoenix office to his home here, Louis Hudgin proclaimed his gas mileage “pitiful.” He averaged just 88.3 miles per gallon (in a 2000 Honda Insight Hybrid)…Hudgin’s disappointment – he usually averages about 100 mpg this time of year…He’s a hypermiler, part of a loose-knit legion of commuters who’ve made racking up seemingly unatainable mpg an art. And a Sport…”

Some “Hypermiler” websites for us to explore:

CleanMPG.com, Greenhybrid.com, Hypermiling.com, 100 Tips to save gas

Go see “Thurgood,” a play depicting the life of Thurgood Marshall, who was lead attorney in the Brown v. Board of Education (1954) school desegregation case and the first African American Supreme Court Justice (1967).

The lead role is currently being played by noted Hollywood actor, Laurence Fishburne, with whom New York Times columnist, Zachary Pincus-Roth recently sat down for an interview (click here to read original interview). Here is an excerpt of that interview:

At a lunch interview in a Los Angeles cafe, Mr. Fishburne — who arrived on his BMW GS1100 motorcycle wearing jeans and a tight, black long-sleeve shirt adorned in tattoo art — recalled a high school field trip to Broadway to see James Earl Jones in a solo play about the black actor, singer and activist Paul Robeson.

“He was never mentioned in any classroom I had been in, and I learned a great deal,” he said. “I was inspired.”

Before reading George Stevens Jr.’s script for “Thurgood (click here to read a quick synopsis of this interesting life.),” he knew little about Marshall’s early career as the civil rights lawyer who argued Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 case that ended official segregation in public schools. “My only real knowledge of him was that he was the first black man appointed to the United States Supreme Court,” Mr. Fishburne said. “I thought that this would be an opportunity for me to educate people.”

“….Fittingly, Mr. Fishburne is taking over a role originated by Mr. [James Earl] Jones, at the Westport Country Playhouse in Connecticut in 2006. It’s a familiar path for him: in “Fences,” he played Troy Maxson, the role for which Mr. Jones won a Tony Award (in “Fences”, a play published in 1985 by August Wilson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright).

Mr. Jones decided not to continue with “Thurgood” and is now on Broadway in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.” Through a publicist, he declined comment, except to say that he admires Mr. Fishburne’s talents and wishes the production good luck. “Thurgood” is presented as a lecture at Howard University, where Marshall attended law school. Marshall, 83 years old and retired, takes the audience on a journey through his career, with a focus on his fight for integration.