2007 U.S. Financial Report and Government Accountability Office memo warn of tough times coming for American tax payers.

Found this at Steve Skojec’s excellent blog, here (post called: “economic stimulus package: made in China.”):

According to the 2007 U.S. Financial Report, here’s Government Accountability Office’s included memo that tries to give the lowdown on the unaccounted for future liabilities:

“Fiscal year 2007 marked the second year in which the Statement of Social Insurance has been presented as a basic financial statement. As noted above, this year, we were able to render an unqualified opinion on the 2007 Statement of Social Insurance. This is a significant accomplishment for the federal government. This statement shows that projected scheduled benefits exceed earmarked revenues by approximately $41 trillion in present value terms for the next 75-year period.

Considering this projected gap in social insurance, in addition to reported liabilities (e.g., debt held by the public and federal employee and veterans benefits payable) and other implicit commitments and contingencies that the federal government has pledged to support, the federal government’s fiscal exposures totaled approximately $53 trillion as of September 30, 2007, up more than $2 trillion from September 30, 2006, and an increase of more than $32 trillion from about $20 trillion as of September 30, 2000.

This translates into a current burden of about $175,000 per American or approximately $455,000 per American household. (page 33)”

And then this:

“Unsustainable Debt…”

“As noted earlier, the Government must borrow from the public to finance any gaps between expenditures and revenues. Increased borrowing leads to higher debt service (net interest) which in turn can make it more difficult to balance expenditures and revenues in the future. Chart J shows that by 2030, public debt is projected to rise to 68 percent of GDP, surpassing the non-wartime peak of 49 percent in 1993. By 2040, public debt is projected to be 128 percent of GDP, well above the World War II peak of 109 percent, and by 2080, debt is projected to approach 600 percent of GDP.

At some point before the debt reaches such unprecedented levels, the world’s financial markets would likely cease lending to the United States. Although the precise point at which this would occur is unknown, these projected debt levels cannot be sustained indefinitely. Many economists believe that persistent debt/GDP levels over 100% are unhealthy. The U.S. is projected to surpass that mark within the next 30 years, with the debt/GDP ratio at that point on a continually and dramatically rising trajectory (more than 10 percentage points per decade through 2080). Avoiding the catastrophic consequences of this fiscal path will require action to bring program expenditures in line with available resources. How soon those actions are taken will greatly influence their ultimate impact on the Nation. (page 19)”

The blogger who originally posted these snippets from the 2007 U.S. Financial Report, Steve skojec, adds:

“Did you notice anything off about these two paragraphs? Maybe the idea that we’re fast approaching a debt that’s 600 TIMES THE GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT OF THE WEALTHIEST NATION ON EARTH? How about the fact that the financial report itself characterizes the consequences of this trend as “CATASTROPHIC”?”

==interesting and scary….If this information scares you or is something you have not heard before, you should really check out Ron Paul and some of his speeches on yourtube and else where as he is one of the few politicians who has been trying to warn against the dangerous fiscal policies of our central bank, the federal reserve, as well as the spending habits of the US Federal Government.

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One Response

  1. […] levels in years, the U.S. government is expected to save billions of dollars, and Thousands of American families are expected to have regained the privilege of enjoying the rest of their Childrens’ […]

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