Cesar Huesca is a bad man…Best Guitarist in Mexico, Bar none.

Tight, clean version of Stevie Ray Vaughn’s Little Wing:

Click here to see all of Cesar Huesca’s videos…he does incredible versions of songs by Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Stevie Ray Vaughn’s Little Wing, Eddie Van Halen’s Eruption, Paul Gilbert’s ‘Technical Difficulties,’ Eric Johnson’s Manhattan, Jerry C’s Cannon Rock and songs by John Petrucci, and others as well…also, he tells about his guitar gear and effects setup so you guitar geeks can all try to get the tones he gets, very cool.

Cesar’s version of Jerry C’s Cannon Rock (originally by Pachelbel):

Cesar’s AMAZING playing on ‘Technical Difficulties,’ by Paul Gilbert:

Person John Petrucci
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Awesome video of Armless man (Mark Goffeney) jamming Tom Petty’s ‘Last Dance with Mary Jane’on guitar with his feet in San Diego’s Balboa Park in 2003. Inspiring.

This man, Mark Goffeney, must work so hard at his playing, I can’t even imagine what life is like for him. Life is beautiful (incredibly inspiring to me):

Check out this great article to learn more about Mark from Ability Magazine: http://abilitymagazine.com/Mark-Goffeney.html

http://www.myspace.com/bigtoerocks

I like this Youtube video from 1975: Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed Jamming “Jerry’s Breakdown”

Poll says predictions for short-term progress grimmest in nearly 50 years

WASHINGTON – Growing numbers of middle-class Americans say they are not better off than they were five years ago, reflecting economic pressures amid growing debt, a study released Wednesday shows. Their short-term assessments of personal progress, according to the study, is the worst it has been in almost half a century.

The survey by the Pew Research Center, a Washington-based research organization, paints a mixed picture for the 53 percent of adults in the country who define themselves as “middle class,” with household incomes ranging from below $40,000 to more than $100,000.

It found that a majority of Americans said they have not progressed in the past five years. One in four, or 25 percent, said their economic situation had not improved, while 31 percent said they had fallen backward. Those numbers together are the highest since the survey question was first asked in 1964. Among the middle class, 54 percent said they had made no progress (26 percent) or fallen back (28 percent).

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Middle-class prosperity also lagged compared with richer Americans. From 1983 to 2004, the median net worth of upper-income families — defined as households with annual incomes above 150 percent of the median — grew by 123 percent, while the median net worth of middle-income families rose by just 29 percent.